wine bottles

Article and Photos by Robert Lundahl
 
 
There are many organizations that have created sustainability programs, and one common characteristic the early adopters share is a focus on “key indicators,” from water consumption, to energy use, and so on, down the line. While these “first generation” programs have successfully measured environmental progress on the ground, the sustainability department is often an accounting or risk management department in disguise.

As customers search for meaning in their lives, and that search supports “green” consumer choices, the bridge between the two, what a brand stands for, and it’s footprint on the planet, is still the road less traveled.

Sure, Ben and Jerry and others have made their cause their brand. But “You are what you eat,” as the old saying goes, as a business strategy, as a brand strategy, is ignored at a company’s peril in 2015.
 
 
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This is an era where business values, measured as sustainability indicators, need to be communicated smartly, and well — simply put, because that’s what people care about.

The school age child who learns about disappearing lions, tigers, leopards, rhinos, coral reefs, orcas, birds, salmon, polar bears, and other species, water shortages, pollution, and rising global temperatures, may well become the owner of a computer, a car, may live in a city, dine out, purchase clothes, food, and home consumer goods, very shortly. And in that lapse of just a few years, the character and quality of life on Earth and the quality of our lives will change, on average, how should we say, not for the better. Nor for the easier.

The better educated that school child becomes, the more affluence they have access to, the more they will comprehend the world in which they live.

Now hospitality businesses like wineries, resorts, and restaurants will sometimes have a sustainability web page, or a video, perhaps not. But the name of the game in a universe of “all-in” social media, is customer engagement.

The sustainability department is now the company. Sustainability is the Branding of the 21st Century.

That’s easy to see, but the “fail” for most, comes with implementation. How do we tell the story? Is it a conversation that lives and breathes, because of its relevancy and interest? Is the story told across multiple platforms in a seamless manner, taking advantage of axioms like reach and frequency that advertising depends on? What about positioning, messaging, and targeting — how do we stack up against the competition and why, how do we frame or tell the story, and who specifically are we having a conversation with?
 
 
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The tenets of traditional marketing, when applied to digital communications, cut through the clutter and claims, creating a simple and understandable approach that guides effective campaigns. But this new landscape, where we talk about people and our relationship to nature and natural systems, how we fit in, and how we work together — beautifully and cleverly — to extend the resources we have, seems new at first.

Techy, specific, a mix of science and art, technology and big ideas, design, health, habitat, agriculture, water and food/beverage, countless brands have taken their first steps, but we can do much better.

Words are important. When we discuss trees, do we conserve or save? What is an ecosystem? How do we learn as we enjoy? Most importantly how do we make 21st Century Branding work like nature itself, like an ecosystem of ideas and experiences.

It is as true in branding as it is in engineering. Objects are de-materializing. More software, less hardware. We make less things. We create more connections, conversations, tele-presence, and vision.
 
 
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In a time of California’s perhaps unprecedented drought, and the radical transparency of the on-line space, negative stereotypes are seen for what they are.

Wine producers using dry farming techniques, and rainwater harvesting and cachement, stand tall amid uncertainty; they rise above the pre-existing conversations in the market and in the media, “Who gets the water and at what price?” And isn’t that, as one example, something to talk about? Positioning against market forces to differentiate the brand is a “natural.”

Sustainability, meet integrated communications.

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As global concerns become institutionalized through language and programmatic expression, humans rely on definitions to describe beneficial practices and actions.

Gro Harlem Brundtland

Gro Harlem Brundtland

The concept of Sustainability as a definition originated with Gro Harlem Brundtland, a former Prime Minister of Norway. In 1983, United Nations Secretary-General Javier Pérez de Cuéllar invited Brundtland to establish and chair the World Commission on Environment and Development (WCED), AKA The Brundtland Commission. In the course of public hearings, the commission developed the broad political concept of sustainable development. The commission’s report, “Our Common Future,” described sustainable development as, “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”.

As with most institutionalized definitions, an important consideration is who or what is doing the defining.

In this case, the United Nations sought to incorporate an environmental agenda into strategic planning and development goals. While “Our Common Future” signaled the beginning of the usage of specific terminology, i.e. “Sustainable Development,” later shortened in usage to “Sustainability,” it was not the beginning of the concept, or the recognition of the need to consider future planning from the standpoint of the natural sciences.

Fundamental to an understanding of the interrelationships of species and resources, food, water, and incorporating the presence of “pollution,” or substances originating outside a natural eco “system,” negatively impacting that system, is the term “carrying capacity.”

Carrying capacity is a concept that relates to the biological issue of scale.

It was originally applied to population environments that were simple, like the number of sheep or cattle that could be grazed on a parcel of land.

With regard to definitions we need to consider also the inputs or assumptions they carry. For example, carrying capacity related to non-adapted or imported/exotic species like cattle in North America, where the dominant native large herbivore was the Bison, represents a one dimensional construct or framework of understanding that mis-identifies the analysis. The carrying capacity of human mitigated environments is not necessarily relevant.

In this regard, carrying capacity is not simply a matter of scale, but of perception and practice, ideas, right or wrong.

Human factors aside, species studied with respect to carrying capacity exhibit two patterns, the sigmoid and peak phenomena.

Sigmoid and Peak Phenomena

Sigmoid and Peak Phenomena


Populations that increase rapidly while food and habitat are abundant, and then slow down as regulatory factors such as lower birth rate and reduced food availability come into play exhibit the sigmoid pattern. As the rate of population growth slows down to zero, the population reaches a fairly stable level. This pattern is referred to as K (for constant) selected species.

In the other pattern –– the peak phenomena, regulatory factors do not come into play. The population increases rapidly to the point where it exhausts the resources upon which it depends. At this point, the population collapses to a low level. When resources are replenished the population again increases; the process is then repeated. This is referred to as the “r-selected” species.

The concept of carrying capacity began to be applied to humans in the 1960s. It was realized that the consumption habits of humans are much more variable than other species. For this reason, it was thought to be more difficult to predict the carrying capacity for humans. This led to the implementation of the IPAT Equation. The IPAT Equation was one of the earlier attempts to describe the role of multiple factors in determining environmental degradation.

Here, environmental impact (I) may be expressed in terms of resource depletion or waste accumulation; population (P) refers to the size of the human population; affluence (A) refers to the level of consumption by that population; and technology (T) refers to the processes used to obtain resources and transform them into useful goods and wastes.

The big question for human civilization is whether we are a K or r-selected species; whether we will reach a stable level that can be sustained for an indefinite period; or whether we will grow to a peak and collapse.

“…carrying capacity is determined jointly by human choices and natural constraints. Consequently, the question, how many people can the Earth support, does not have a single numerical answer, now or ever. Human choices about the Earth’s human carrying capacity are constrained by facts of nature, which we understand poorly. So any estimates of human carrying capacity are only conditional on future human choices and natural events.”

-Joel Cohen. Human population growth and the carrying capacity concept. Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America, 1994, 75: 141-157.

What humans choose to do is the biggest variable in climate change science.

Later this year, France will be hosting and presiding the 21st Session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP21/CMP11), otherwise known as “Paris 2015.”

COP21 is intended to achieve a new international agreement on the climate, applicable to all countries, with the aim of keeping global warming below 2°C.

Here Laurent Fabius, minister of Foreign Affairs and International Development, introduces the conference with a stark assessment, “We are the first generation to become aware of the problem and yet the last generation that can deal with it.”

“There is no Plan B for action, just as there is no Planet B.”
 

 
Climate change is not the only driver of sustainability, but if, as Fabius suggests, it is the most compelling one, for in his words the world will stand “face to face with its future,” humans also stand face to face with a problem of enormous complexity, far beyond IPAT’s limited assessment.

Layers of re-definition accumulate atop the originals. Brundtland’s key definition of Sustainable Development –– development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. has been (perhaps) conditioned through subsequent usage as including the addendum “not sustained growth.”

(Sustainable Measures, Developed by US EPA Office of Sustainable Ecosystems and Communities (OSEC), under a cooperative agreement with Lowell Center for Sustainable Production, University of Massachusetts, Lowell. Copyright © 1998-2000 Maureen Hart. All rights reserved.)

But as with all definitions we must also consider whether any assumptions are valid as to accumulated knowledge or civic memory rather than simply taking account of new definitions as “random snapshots” of a multi-plicitous reality whose unity, progression, or cumulative utilization of language based agreements, content or semiotics cannot be assured.

Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development

Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development


As we look to the history of sustainable development or sustainability policy awareness, and therefore to the pre-definitional use of the word itself, The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in 1960, defined goals as:
“…achieve the highest sustainable economic growth and employment and a rising standard of living in Member countries, while maintaining financial stability, and thus to contribute to the development of the world economy”

Here we question “meaning” in light of the language, comparing the OECD’s practical definition of “Sustainable,” in light of Brundtland’s. Can we assume Brundtland’s definition “builds on” OECD’s? OECD requires a “rising standard of living,” while Brundtland’s substitutes the term “development,” non-specific with regard to implications of financial “growth.” Finally, Sustainable Measures, in “on the ground training” for corporations and communities, further offers “redefinition” as “not sustained growth.” Such scholarly “cherry picking” does not indicate a social agreement, evolution of thinking, or pathway forward.

Are these variations reflective of continuing uncertainty regarding the balance of economy, society and environment (The Three Pillars of Sustainability)?

sustainability-1

“The ‘Chief Sustainability Officer,’ sometimes known by other titles, is the corporate title of an executive position within a corporation that is in charge of the corporation’s “environmental” programs. Several companies have created such environmental manager positions in the 21st century to formalize their commitment to the environment.”
-Wikipedia

Measures like Corporate Sustainability programs, following a paradigm set by CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) models, report on efficiencies in key indicators. A different office may well handle policy, and “Vision” may originate with the CEO.

Finally, sustainability practices may be adopted sporadically, or implemented inconsistently within any organization or company.

The uniquely human adaptive strategy of recognizing reality isn’t necessarily what we say it is has manifested in community movements which avoid “top down” definitions of sustainability altogether.

In the case of the sponge, animals of the phylum Porifera, which lack a central nervous system, cells exchange information more readily and equally with one another. Strangely, proteins made by the sponge genes were found to interact with one another in ways similar to proteins in human synapses.

“Not only do they have [human synapse genes], they also have this signature that they may be functioning in a similar way in the absence of a nervous system, as they do in the presence of one,” says Todd Oakley, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB).

2015-Alternatiba-flyer-jeudi-alternatibar-v2_Page_1-300x212xx

One such human network, Alternatiba, seeks to mobilize society. Alternatiba events raise people’s awareness and stimulate behavior change. Events provide hundreds of alternatives in order to raise people’s awareness, and have been or will be organized in over sixty different French and European cities. Additionally, these initiatives aim to put pressure on politicians, especially with regard to the upcoming United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

As society’s leaders, corporations, and citizens begin a process by which each can walk with the other, it becomes clear that corporate sustainability report cards and policy definitions, however helpful, fall short in uniting diverse communities creating real change in both indicators and behaviors.

What the human race has up its sleeve is values –– and the ability to communicate the values and benefits of working together. Computing the tonnage of GHGs not released into the atmosphere, miles not driven, trees conserved, and water not used, is, in itself a silo-ed approach. Net-zero is the only measurement of success on the environmental balance sheet.

The moral and ethical dimensions of sustainability are something else. Nothing is sustainable if humans are not sustainable with each other. In the higher echelons of public apparatus, the Pope, a Prince and a President have weighed in, along with the World Bank, leaders at the World Economic Forum, and organizers of Cop21, or Paris 2015.

“The pope’s attention to climate change …highlights the plight of the poor and the moral dimensions of environmental issues. It also comes as a welcome counterbalance to the fixation on global-scale human influence on the environment that, for better and for worse, has come to define the Anthropocene – the name attached to the age of human dominance over the planet. ”

(With Encyclical, Pope Francis Elevates Environmental Justice, Lisa Sideris, Associate Professor of Religious Studies, Director IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society at Indiana University, Bloomington, The Conversation, June 15, 2015).

“[This is] an absolutely crucial opportunity, if not the last chance before we end up in an irreversible situation, for the international community to establish a new set of interlocking, coherent and ambitious frameworks governing human development, poverty, disaster risk reduction, the natural environment and climate change. We could, and should, see an agenda set for the coming decades that is capable of transforming the prospects for humanity by improving and nurturing the state of the planet upon which we all depend.”

(Quote from Prince Charles, Prince Charles: Global Pact on Climate Change Could be Magna Carta for Earth. Fiona Harvey, The Guardian. Monday, 26 January 2015).

“Today President Obama raised the bar with a stronger rule and by doing so he has sent a definite message and much overdue comprehensive acknowledgement that climate is a civil rights and moral issue as well as a health, economic, and environmental issue. Implementation of the rule must require states to conduct a compliance review under civil rights and environmental justice laws. This includes the President’s Executive Order 12898 on environmental justice and health, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the National Environmental Policy Act.

Beyond climate change concerns, reductions in power plant pollutants will reduce environmental and public health problems, including acid deposition, fine particle air pollution, mercury deposition, nitrogen deposition, ozone smog, and regional haze. Thousands of premature deaths will be prevented each year. Hundreds of thousands of asthma attacks will be a shameful tragedy of the past. Today is a especially good day for communities of color suffering disproportionally from the effects of pollution.”

(AFC+A Statement on Clean Power Plan Rule –– President Obama Raises the Bar for Environmental Justice With Final Clean Power Plan That Lives Up to Climate of Hope. Americas for Conservation and the Arts, Irene Vilar, Founder & Director, AFC+A and ALEF, Guggenheim Fellow).

Only community involvement, to prevent disproportionate impacts in rural communities, communities of color, and economically disadvantaged communities can ensure a reasoned and democratic approach to climate change policy implementation. In this light, our ability to reach equitable, moral, or ethical solutions is yet another variable of the human condition and the human’s survivability potential, a potential based on future choices.

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Watch Harvest Dreams on Vimeo – Until September 1, 2015.

Purchase DVDs for Home or School/Library

Harvest_Dreams_sustainx


Klallam_Dancers

I am sure you have heard by now, the fish are already starting to utilize the habitat up above where the projects used to be located. It is awesome, and it is going to keep getting better. I just want to say that I know in my heart that your film and the work you did had a huge impact on the ways things turned out and I am still very grateful to you for that work you did.

Rachel Hagaman (Kowalski), Economic Director, Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe

Background

Unconquering the Last Frontier is the Epic Story of the Damming and Undamming of the Elwha River. Filming began in 1993 in Port Angeles, Washington. Production continued for five years, through 1997. The Filmmakers’ mission was to document the efforts of the tribal community and others, to preserve the genetics of the last wild salmon, while the political drama over funding, related to Elwha dam removal played out at the federal level.

The process of making this film created a solid perspective, showing both sides of the issue in depth. The narrative is revealing of the larger scope of need for preserving the what we have left of our nation’s wild places. Our team saw the benefit of redeeming a river, by removing the harness of misguided, industrial encroachment.

The film was released, during special screenings in the San Francisco Bay Area and in Western Washington, to public television stations and to cable (Free Speech TV). A companion fine art photo exhibit, from photography commissioned by the National Park Service, (Large scale digital prints from film positive), was created and displayed in California and Washington. 2006-2008.

Patagonia headquarters, Ventura, CA, BC Space Gallery, Laguna Beach, CA, Seed Gallery, Thoreau Center for Sustainability, San Francisco, Odd Art Gallery, Port Angeles, WA.

The film itself was shot traditionally, using crystal-sync double-system. Eastman Kodak 16mm color negative film was exposed through a French made Eclair ACL 1.5 camera with Angenieux lenses. Audio was mastered on quarter inch reel-to-reel magnetic tape, using the industry standard stereo Nagra IVs-tc recorder, modified for center-track timecode.

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“Shooting on film was a work of art.” Says filmmaker Robert Lundahl. “Certainly editing on a flatbed was a work of art. It helps you see the process differently. It makes a different kind of film.”

Unconquering was one of the last productions to utilize the celluloid/acetate motion picture film format, and one of the last films to be printed at San Francisco’s historic Monaco Labs. “It was a statement,” says Filmmaker, Robert Lundahl.

Motion picture film began to be used commonly in the teens, just at the time the dams were built. One of the customers of the power from the dams was Rayonier Mill. Rayonier, in addition to making celluloid compounds for table tennis balls and guitar picks, made materials for movie films, thus helping to launch one of the defining industries of the 20th century. As the era ended, symbolized by the removal of the Elwha River dams, so did the era end for motion picture film.

The Film

Washington’s Elwha was known to produce the largest salmon in the lower 48 states. The Elwha Kings were the stuff of fishing legend, Chinook salmon weighed in at up to 100 lbs.
This legendary river was dammed in 1908 and again in 1926, in one of the first examples of non-local capital arriving into frontier environments for industrial based energy development.

Seattle Times writer, Lynda Mapes described Unconquering the Last Frontier as “The history of the entire Pacific Northwest.” It is, in a fundamental sense. When the Elwha Dam was built, the State of Washington had a law on the books, requiring that all dams must be built with fish ladders. But the Elwha River did not have fish ladders. None were possible, given the construction. The dam hung from steep canyon walls, leaving no easy access for spawning anadromous fish to reach their destination far upstream, once construction was complete. The prime spawning beds , home to their prehistoric ancestors, were no longer accessible.

The eventual interpretation of the legal remedy was to build a hatchery, done in lieu of a having the legally mandated fish ladders. Thus the Elwha set the unsustainable precedent of the hatchery system in the Pacific Northwest, which in turn, led to the construction of more dams and the subsequent devastation of even more fish runs. In that the hatchery on the Elwha was not successful, the trend led to even greater loss of natural resources.

Salmon runs, having uniquely evolved to match their specific spawning milieus, were choked to extinction by the loss of prime spawning habitat.

The Lower Elwha Klallam Indians made this river their home.

The watershed provided the basis for their sustenance and psychological well-being, providing food sources and offering spiritually important sacred sites. And then, through the Devil’s bargain, the salmon could no longer pass upstream of the dams. Their future was damned. Runs of world class fish were subsequently devastated, the resource utterly ruined in a series of mass die-offs.

They (salmon carcasses) were laid up all over the riverbank.” –Rachel Hagaman, Economic Director, Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe.

The people faced a similar plight. After their ranks had been decimated by smallpox and other European diseases, the Indian people were indiscriminately persecuted by the arriving settlers. They were forced to abide by laws that were unfair and even genocidal to them, such as being forbidden to fish in their usual and accustomed grounds. If an Indian were to be caught fishing, they could be taken to jail, starvation conditions aside.

unconquering_title

Documentary filmmaker Robert Lundahl embarked on a decade-long journey in 1993, to tell the story of the Lower Elwha people and the river which had sustained them. His picture, released to theaters in the San Francisco Bay Area and across the Northwest in 2000, is the only film to address the historic trauma befalling the Native people.

This is important because, arguably, the history of events on the Elwha has been subject to political interpretations to this day. Many which marginalize Native people and deny their voice, jeopardizing their cultural and physical survival. UNDRIP, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples sets agreed upon standards which “affirm that indigenous peoples are equal to all other peoples, while recognizing the right of all peoples to be different, to consider themselves different, and to be respected as such.” The film represents the clear-eyed understanding, on the ground, that UNDRIP requires.

Future

As the salmon move upstream to spawn and die, the marine-derived nutrients in their bodies will be returned to the forest along 113 km of wild river. Several hundred thousand salmon will eventually repopulate the river annually, bringing a huge quantity of nutrients that will permeate throughout the ecosystem. Because all of the water above the upper dam is in the Olympic National Park, these ecological changes will be available for long-term study, without the confounding influences of human disturbance that are common in virtually all other river restoration projects. Thus, the Elwha dams, by far the largest ever to be removed, constitute a unique opportunity to study the recovery of a riparian ecosystem, with profound implications for the value of dam removal elsewhere as a general conservation strategy (The University of Washington).

The removal of the concrete structures of the Elwha Dams began in 2012, initiating a profoundly new era in conservation management. Never before had dams this large been removed. Never before had an ecosystem been ameliorated like this, restoring complex interactions and allowing synergistic effects to resume flourishing naturally once again.

Our obligation to the future includes making this watershed picture available to new audiences, as an anthem for restoring balance to the world and a bold idea for preserving hope. When Winona LaDuke invites us to “recover the sacred,” the well known Native American organizer is requesting far more than the rescue of ancient bones and beaded headbands from museums. For LaDuke, only the power to define what is sacred—and access it—will enable Native American communities to remember who they are and fashion their future.

In the healing of historical trauma, the restoration plays a significant part in returning dignity to the indigenous cohort of our nation’s population, an important social aspect necessary for our growth and development as a modern group of people.

The Changer, or Transformer is a supernatural force or being capable of transforming one species into another, a bear into a deer, or a wolf.

It is not enough to just remove the concrete superstructure from a river, if what is left behind is mere drainage. It’s not enough to just reintroduce salmon populations to a river. We must support the historical narrative, and acknowledge the emotions of a people as we witness the return of a way of life that had once been taken from them. To understand the essence of the Elwha Story, understanding the Klallam and their culture is essential. To understand what the settlers and the dams took away is to begin to understand what the river means to all of us. It is as close as we’ve gotten to redress and reconciliation, which is to say that environmental justice and stewardship are one in the same. The Elwha provides a tangible lesson on both, for the be benefit of people around the world to see and consider.

History

Unconquering the Last Frontier is a work of history. The film relies on original, first person accounts dating to the 1830s. The film is in use educationally by Harvard, Yale, Dartmouth, The University of Washington and other top universities. It has been publicly vetted and peer reviewed. Unconquering is in the collection of The Smithsonian/ National Museum of the American Indian.

Unconquering the Last Frontier clarifies the actions of the past through a rigorous examination of historical facts.
Unconquering examines the nature of energy development at that time, as events on the ground played out in context during the early years of the 20th century.
-The film reveals that Native Americans placed logs along the river to help manage flows and fisheries in the mid 1800s.
-That fisheries pressures were not new and the Territories of Oregon and Washington declared emergencies in the 1870’s as the fish were dangerously over harvested.
-The film examines whether the Elwha dams were built legally and whether the dams’ builder, Thomas Aldwell promised to build fish ladders as a condition of their construction.
-Unconquering the Last Frontier describes the relationship between the Elwha Dams and the hatchery system across the Northwest, as a precursor and precedent.
-Unconquering the Last Frontier examines the history as told by the Native people themselves, and their attitudes about it.

DCIM101GOPROPhoto: Tom Roorda

The Lesson Plan

It is of global importance, how the story of the restoration of the Elwha River and fisheries came into being be told. To this date, full ecosystem restoration at this scale has occurred only once. We are looking at the prime and only example of large scale remediation to the river ecosystem including the landscape, fisheries, culture, spirit and economy of a Pacific Northwest Region. In restoring the Elwha, we have a pattern for other endeavors and a seed for success. It can be done.

According to the Center for Biological Diversity, “Ecological restoration is the process of reclaiming habitat and ecosystem functions by restoring the lands and waters on which plants and animals depend. Restoration is a corrective step that involves eliminating or modifying causes of ecological degradation and re-establishing the natural processes — like natural fires, floods, or predator-prey relationships — that sustain and renew ecosystems over time.”

1. It is important to introduce the concept that ecological restoration is worthy of consideration in addressing landscape level issues having to do with water, toxic substances, ecosystem health and the health of people. With regard to the public/private process to restore the Salton Sea, reintroduction of water to the system allows ecosystems to be supported and to become more fecund, making for a cleaner and healthier environment and thus stabilizing the region.

The removal of water from the southern San Joaquin Valley similarly sees soils become salted, non-productive, and subject to conversion from agriculture to energy production (fracking) and other industries. Toxic compounds compile at specific locations, affecting wildlife and avian species and human beings, through blowing dust and particulates. The lesson of the Elwha is “Let nature run its course.”

Unconquering the Last Frontier shows the debate, framing the story of a waterfront mill town as it ponders its future while confronting its past.

2. Show that what happened on the Elwha, for better and for worse, as the result of decisions made by people who affected the outcome. The decision to build the Lower Elwha Dam, which cut off the fishery 4.3 miles upriver, was a decision based on engineering and cost for the specific purpose of generating power at that location. It is important to realize that a myriad of choices were available to the solution of generating power. The location on the Elwha, as a specific site to do that, had an enormous down side.

What some people did not know then about the fragility of the resource became, over time, the top consideration from a policy and cost perspective across the entire Pacific Northwest region. It would be fair to say, in addition to questions about legality, morality, and philosophy, that questions still remain about the engineering decisions made.

Too often our society solves a problem having to do with financial benefits accruing. Yet, had the “engineering” solution been better focused on generating power at less cost and detriment overall, the solution might have been entirely different.

How we think about the context and consequencess of our actions is critical to their outcome. In this way, we begin to account for the likelihood of unintended result in the design/engineering process itself.

If an analysis of context and consequences was inadequate in the beginning, we may be assured we will eventually be looking at GIGO (Garbage In, Garbage Out). As simple as this idea sounds, we still are faced with the same scale of poor outcomes, made by decisions mandated by financial incentives, without weighing the true costs. We build solar generation plants in dry lake beds, atop prehistoric Native American ruins, and accept renewable energy installations that require burning fossil fuels- natural gas, to maintain output, making them not renewable at all.

Even today, these costly errors are still committed. We have not learned yet, despite a desperate need to embrace a more intelligent way of being on the planet without wrecking the ecology.

3. Connecting the dots via a side-by-side demonstration of the restored meander of the lower river with the reconstitution of the estuary, compared to then and now aerial photography, filmmaking, etc. Connect the dots by interviewing tribal members about the meaning of “recover the sacred.” Interviews with select individuals from the original film, including the filmmakers, round out the perspective related to the full spectrum of happenings stimulated by this bold and historic undertaking.


 
elwha composite
 


24May

29 Screening

 
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“WHO’S PAYING FOR THIS?” Script 3.8. Written By Robert Lundahl 415.205.3481

CUT TO: HISTORIC SCENES, BAY DELTA FARMING.
DISSOLVE TO: SERIES OF CUTS: TUNNEL PROJECT RENDERINGS. FRACKING WELLS, PROTESTERS HOLD NO FRACKING SIGNS. LAWNS BEING WATERED SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

NARRATOR: Governor Brown’s proposed $60+ billion twin-tunnel project would divert water from The Bay/Delta Estuary, from salmon fisheries and recreational activites, from productive family farms, and diversified agriculture, to land speculation in Riverside County, to BIG AG. What does that mean for you?

DISSOLVE TO: SHOTS OF DOWNTOWN LA, VALLEY NEIGHBORHOODS SMOG, GAS STATIONS

NARRATOR: Because of conservation measures, Los Angeles uses the same amount of water it did 20 years ago. Now with the money going to the latest pipe dream, there may be no money to invest in local infrastructure, such as water reuse and recycling. Rainwater capture and conservation education.

With a 60 Billion dollar price tag, the costs are ASTRONOMICAL to all of California.

CUT TO: HISTORIC SCENES, BIG DIG. BAY BRIDGE RETROFIT

NARRATOR: Bigger than the Big Dig.
GRAPHIC: 24 BILLION.

NARRATOR: Bigger than the Bay Bridge retrofit.
GRAPHIC: 250 MILLION.

DISSOLVE TO: SERIES OF CUTS: WATER IN THE CANALS HEADING SOUTH.
CUT TO: DRY LAWNS, DRY HILLS, NEWSPAPERS DESCRIBE WATER USE CUTS.

NARRATOR: Currently, millions of gallons of water from the state water project — that rate- payers have already paid for — go to the highest bidder. Big Business.

GRAPHIC: 60 BILLION. BACKGROUND IMAGE – MONEY PILES UP (STOCK ANIMATION)
YOUNG MAN STANDS BEFORE CAMERA.

NARRATOR: Four years into the worst drought in the state’s recorded history, the state’s residents are scared.

STAND UP INTERVIEW WITH YOUNG MAN: “Who’s going to pay for this? What’s my future? Leave the state? This is a total scam.”

STAND UP INTERVIEW WITH OLDER WOMAN: “The California Dream is O-V-E-R if Brown gets his way.

RELAXED DISSOLVE – TO MONTAGE SCENES OF WATER FLOWING THROUGH TRIBUTARIES AND ALONG THE BANKS OF THE SACRAMENTO, DELTA WETLANDS, BIRDS, FISHING.

NARRATOR: The Sacramento/San Joaquin Bay Delta is where BIG AG wants to get its water. A vast river and marine estuary system for the entire San Francisco Bay Area Region, and the State of California.

GRAPHIC: 60 BILLION.

MONTAGE BIG AG, OIL AND GAS WELLS BAKERSFIELD, HORIZONS JAMMED WITH WELLS, DIRTY PARTS OF THE SAN JOAQUIN, INDUSTRIAL LANDSCAPES, CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS, HYDROCARBONS

NARRATOR: Not only does BIG AG take clean water, and mix it with 750 toxic chemicals, many of them carcinogens, it sends that dirty water deep underground to break rock for oil and gas production. It’s called fracking.

GRAPHIC: 60 BILLION.

MONTAGE: BIG AG Scenes.

NARRATOR: Central Valley agribusiness leases land to oil companies. These farmers-for-hire do their bidding. BIG AG works for BIG OIL. They’re not going to report a spill, unless they have to.

At a time when voters expect innovative solutions. This administration sticks to the same ‘ol same ‘ol. Contracts to cronies and big business.

GRAPHIC: 60 BILLION. BACKGROUND, CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS, HYDROCARBONS.

NARRATOR: When the farms lands don’t drain, and the San Joaquin Valley salts up, it can no longer be farmed. How much of its water will be used for speculative development?

Reports indicate that farmers are already irrigating with oil and fracking waste water. Why are we paying to pollute?

GRAPHIC: 60 BILLION.

TRANSITION – FLIP OR PAGE TURN – SHOTS GOVERNOR BROWN WITH OIL AND GAS EXECS, DOLLAR SIGNS DANCING, FAT CATS LIGHTING CIGARS, WILDLIFE RUNNING FOR COVER.

MUSIC UP: PUNK COVER OF CALIFORNIA DREAMING

NARRATOR: And the tunnel scam project that’s behind it has costs of its own: The 2013 Report on Affordability and Financing for the Bay Delta Conservation says $60 million or more. And THAT no longer includes a habitat conservation plan – meaning not just humans will pay the price. Series of cuts of pictures of native fauna. Cute animals.

MUSIC: PUNK COVER OF “CALIFORNIA DREAMING” EVOLVES INTO DISHARMONY, DISCORD, THEN POPS, CRACKLES, DROPOUTS AND FINALLY NOTHING.

CUT TO: STAND UP INTERVIEW YOUNG WOMAN
“They’re getting water very, very cheaply and they’re taking water away from farms.”

CUT TO: STAND UP INTERVIEW OLDER MAN
“In a time of water catastrophe, California is prioritizing unsustainable solutions over sustainable ones, like diversified farming in the Delta.”

NARRATOR: Who’s paying for this?

CUT TO: Ordinary homes on a residential street with a moon overhead.

SFX UP: CRICKETS.

OLDER WOMAN’S VOICE IS HEARD: This… is a nightmare.

SLOW FADE TO BLACK.

###


 
“Go With the Flow” Written By Robert Lundahl 415.205.3481

FADE IN:

CU/WATER DRIPPING FROM A FAUCET
CUT TO: MS/PERSON BEHIND CLOUDY GLASS IN THE SHOWER

NARRATOR OLDER FEMALE: Your health, your family’s health and the health of all Californians depends on clean water.

DISSOLVE TO:

SERIES OF CUTS: GLASS OF WATER SET DOWN ON A KITCHEN TABLE. ASPARAGUS OR OTHER DELTA AG IN THE FIELD WITH DEW DROPS.

CUT TO: CU SHOT OF WATER SKIER OR DELTA RECREATION
AND/OR… CUT TO: SF BAY WINDSURFER

NARRATOR: The water we drink, the food we eat, and the fun we have all depend on clean water.

CUT TO: RESTAURANT INTERIOR/WAITER WITH WATER GLASSES. CHIP FAB ENGINEER IN CLEAN SUIT.

NARRATOR: Our jobs depend on it too.

DISSOLVE TO: VAST AERIAL SHOTS DELTA, FLYOVERS. USGS MAP OF SAN FRANCISCO BAY (PUSH IN).

NARRATOR: The Sacramento/San Joaquin Bay Delta is a vast estuary system for the entire San Francisco Bay Area Region, and the State of California.

RELAXED DISSOLVE – TO MONTAGE SCENES OF WATER FLOWING THROUGH TRIBUTARIES AND ALONG THE BANKS OF THE SACRAMENTO.

NARRATOR: It all comes down to flow.

TRANSITION – FLIP OR PAGE TURN

DISSOLVE SEQUENCE WITH MATCHED PUSH INS CHEMICAL FACTORIES, AGRIBUSINESS, PUMPING STATIONS, CANALS, FREEWAYS, LANDFILLS, SIGN – NO DUMPING, RUNS TO BAY, WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT. (NOTE: We can use the Sac treatment plant shot like documentary but we want the rest of these shots outside of the Delta).

NARRATOR: Mercury, Salts, Selenium, Boron, Nitrogens, bacteria, insecticides and other compounds may be found in water, fish and plants because upstream watersheds drain into the Delta.

MONTAGE OF WATER FLOWING, TRICKLING, AROUND OBSTACLES, ROCKS, PIERS, SANDBARS, MARSHES AND WETLANDS.

DISSOLVE TO: MONTAGE KIDS ALONG THE SHORE PLAY WITH SMALL BOATS (STOW LAKE?)/FOR EFFECT, SHORELINE DELTA, KIDS FISHING.

NARRATOR: Toxic soils can leach back into the water. Low water and reduced flow allow mercury mentholated in higher concentrations.

DISSOLVE TO: SEQUENCE OF CUTS. SIGNS, BEACH CLOSURE, NO FISHING, DO NOT EAT FISH. (Note: no fishing signs down by port).

NARRATOR: Water diversion, water sales, and over-pumping reduce the flow — and turn the Delta from a place– that is an interwoven blend of wetland habitat, farms, and communities — a unique ecological and cultural place, to something far less desirable.

DISSOLVE TO: SEQUENCE OF CUTS. BROWN SPEAKING, TUNNELS RENDERING, NEWSPAPER HEADLINE CU PAN, “ALMONDS TO BE SHIPPED TO CHINA” OR SIMILAR. LOS ANGELES SKYLINE.

NARRATOR:

Politicians also get it wrong. Governor Brown’s proposed $25 billion twin-tunnel project would worsen the problem. By diverting excessive amounts of water, the tunnels would both undermine the health of the Delta, the San Francisco Bay, and the ability for cities like Los Angeles to secure their own water future. Water quality will not meet drinking water standards for health and human safety for millions of people living near the Delta and Bay.

DISSOLVE TO: GRASSES/WETLANDS, DISSOLVE TO: MT. SHASTA SCENIC DISSOLVE TO: SIERRA PEAKS. YOSEMITE VALLEY, DISSOLVE TO: AMERICAN RIVER RAPIDS, CUT TO: FLY FISHERMAN, DISSOLVE TO: SHOTS OF THE KERN AND THE SAN JOAQUIN.

NARRATOR: Our San Francisco Bay Delta is a natural wonder. It naturally drains an enormous area from Mt. Shasta to the North, to the Sierras in the East and the South.
Clear water flows from the snowpacks, down the Sacramento and the Feather, the American, and the Kern, and the San Joaquin, the Molkulumne, Calaveras, and Tuolumne.

DISSOLVE TO: SEQUENCE DELTA BEAUTY SHOTS

NARRATOR: This estuary is the largest in the Western Hemisphere.

MONTAGE: KAYAKERS SPILL OVER RAPIDS, SALMON TRAWLER UNLOADS FROZEN CHINOOK ON THE DOCKS AT HALF MOON BAY, CANADIAN GEESE PASS OVERHEAD IN A V FORMATION.
TOURISTS HAVE LUNCH AT BARBARA’S FISH TRAP ON THE WHARF. KIDS RUN AND PLAY ON THE JETTY AND ON THE BEACH.

NARRATOR: The Bay-Delta estuary is a place that connects rivers, ocean and sky. Communities all up and down the Pacific Coast rely on its riches.
Let’s make sure these riches continue to sustain us for generations to come.

FADE OUT.

###


 
“Water is Life” Written By Robert Lundahl 415.205.3481

FADE IN:
AERIAL SHOTS/VAST EXPANSES OF DELTA WATER

NARRATOR OLDER FEMALE: Water is life, And the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta is the provider of that life for the San Francisco Bay region.

DISSOLVE TO:HISTORIC SHOTS OF SALMON ON THE SACRAMENTO/LARGE NUMBERS

NARRATOR: Chinook salmon spawning in the Upper Sacramento River numbered 450,000 in 1950. Water diversion, dams, pollution and habitat destruction reduced those numbers by 9/10 in the years that followed.

TRANSITION, WIPE OR PUSH, SALMON ON A LINE TODAY

NARRATOR OLDER FEMALE: Will we learn the lesson and protect the natural resources we have left?

CUT TO: DROUGHT HEADLINES/NEWSPAPER SPINS

NARRATOR: The California drought, now in its 5th year, has prompted reactive policy initiatives by state leaders, choosing one industry over another, and one community over another in allocating precious water resources.

DISSOLVE TO CLOSE UP PAN, TUNNEL HEADLINES/NEWSPAPER

NARRATOR: But that’s not the way to go.

RELAXED DISSOLVE – TO MONTAGE FISHING BOATS HALF MOON BAY, RESTAURANTS SERVE SEAFOOD, TOURISTS AT FISHERMAN’S WHARF

NARRATOR: Salmon still support coastal fishermen, and the culinary and hospitality businesses of one of America’s top 5 vacation destinations, San Francisco.

TRANSITION – FLIP OR PAGE TURN – DISSOLVE SEQUENCE WINDSURFING, DELTA/FARMING SCENES/APPLE CAMPUS WITH LOGO

NARRATOR: And healthy salmon runs, like recreational industries, diversified family farming, and even Silicon Valley’s world leading chip manufacture and corporate campuses — Apple, Google, Intel and others — depend on clean water, readily available.

DISSOLVE TO: MONTAGE CONTRA COSTA BUSINESSES/COMMUNITIES, SHOPPERS AT AN OUTDOOR MALL

NARRATOR: Millions of people living in urban areas rely on a healthy Delta for drinking water.

SEQUENCE OF CUTS: TOMATOES, FRUITS AND VEGETABLES AT A FARMERS MARKET, HAPPY FACES/RIPPLES ON THE WATER CLOSE UP, SOFT ZOOM IN AND RACK OUT OF FOCUS

NARRATOR: In a time of unprecedented drought, the answer to our collective water needs in a historically dry state, is the very reverence for life and people, and the resources the region has always provided.

DISSOLVE TO: OLD SPANISH MAP, SAN FRANCISCO BAY,

NARRATOR: Covering 612 square miles, the San Francisco Bay/Delta region is the largest estuary on the U.S. Pacific Coast.

DISSOLVE TO: SEQUENCE GRASSES/WETLANDS, HERON OR EGRET

NARRATOR: It is recognized as one of North America’s most ecologically important estuaries, accounting for 77 percent of California’s remaining perennial wetlands.

DISSOLVE TO: SPORTS (BASS) FISHERMEN. (TOURNAMENT).

NARRATOR: Not only fish, like salmon, bass, steelhead, shad and sturgeon make this biological nursery home,

CUT TO: GIANT FLOCKS OF MIGRATING BIRDS BLACKEN THE SKY

NARRATOR: …but so do the myriad avain species of the Pacific Flyway.

DISSOLVE TO: EARLY SHOTS FARMING IN THE DELTA REGION

NARRATOR: During the California Gold Rush, farmers planted orchards on Delta islands

CUT TO: DAGUERROTYPES OF GOLD RUSH MINERS, PUSH/DISSOLVE THROUGH SEQUENCE

NARRATOR: …to provide fresh fruit for mining camps in the Sierra Nevada.

CUT TO: VEGETABLE CRATE LABELS FROM THE 1930’s/40’s, PUSH/DISSOLVE THROUGH SEQUENCE ROADSIDE STANDS

NARRATOR: Because of the year-round availability of fresh water, the Delta became one of the most fertile regions of California.

SPIGOT TURNED OFF, SOD TORN OUT, NATIVE GARDEN PLANTED

NARRATOR: Today, conservation not favoritism is our future.

FADE OUT.

###


 
“WHO’S PAYING FOR THIS?” Script 3.8. Written By Robert Lundahl 415.205.3481

CUT TO: HISTORIC SCENES, BAY DELTA FARMING.
DISSOLVE TO: SERIES OF CUTS: TUNNEL PROJECT RENDERINGS. FRACKING WELLS, PROTESTERS HOLD NO FRACKING SIGNS. LAWNS BEING WATERED SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

NARRATOR: Governor Brown’s proposed $60+ billion twin-tunnel project would divert water from The Bay/Delta Estuary, from salmon fisheries and recreational activites, from productive family farms, and diversified agriculture, to land speculation in Riverside County, to BIG AG. What does that mean for you?

DISSOLVE TO: SHOTS OF DOWNTOWN LA, VALLEY NEIGHBORHOODS SMOG, GAS STATIONS

NARRATOR: Because of conservation measures, Los Angeles uses the same amount of water it did 20 years ago. Now with the money going to the latest pipe dream, there may be no money to invest in local infrastructure, such as water reuse and recycling. Rainwater capture and conservation education.

With a 60 Billion dollar price tag, the costs are ASTRONOMICAL to all of California.

CUT TO: HISTORIC SCENES, BIG DIG. BAY BRIDGE RETROFIT

NARRATOR: Bigger than the Big Dig.
GRAPHIC: 24 BILLION.

NARRATOR: Bigger than the Bay Bridge retrofit.
GRAPHIC: 250 MILLION.

DISSOLVE TO: SERIES OF CUTS: WATER IN THE CANALS HEADING SOUTH.
CUT TO: DRY LAWNS, DRY HILLS, NEWSPAPERS DESCRIBE WATER USE CUTS.

NARRATOR: Currently, millions of gallons of water from the state water project — that rate- payers have already paid for — go to the highest bidder. Big Business.

GRAPHIC: 60 BILLION. BACKGROUND IMAGE – MONEY PILES UP (STOCK ANIMATION)
YOUNG MAN STANDS BEFORE CAMERA.

NARRATOR: Four years into the worst drought in the state’s recorded history, the state’s residents are scared.

STAND UP INTERVIEW WITH YOUNG MAN: “Who’s going to pay for this? What’s my future? Leave the state? This is a total scam.”

STAND UP INTERVIEW WITH OLDER WOMAN: “The California Dream is O-V-E-R if Brown gets his way.

RELAXED DISSOLVE – TO MONTAGE SCENES OF WATER FLOWING THROUGH TRIBUTARIES AND ALONG THE BANKS OF THE SACRAMENTO, DELTA WETLANDS, BIRDS, FISHING.

NARRATOR: The Sacramento/San Joaquin Bay Delta is where BIG AG wants to get its water. A vast river and marine estuary system for the entire San Francisco Bay Area Region, and the State of California.

GRAPHIC: 60 BILLION.

MONTAGE BIG AG, OIL AND GAS WELLS BAKERSFIELD, HORIZONS JAMMED WITH WELLS, DIRTY PARTS OF THE SAN JOAQUIN, INDUSTRIAL LANDSCAPES, CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS, HYDROCARBONS

NARRATOR: Not only does BIG AG take clean water, and mix it with 750 toxic chemicals, many of them carcinogens, it sends that dirty water deep underground to break rock for oil and gas production. It’s called fracking.

GRAPHIC: 60 BILLION.

MONTAGE: BIG AG Scenes.

NARRATOR: Central Valley agribusiness leases land to oil companies. These farmers-for-hire do their bidding. BIG AG works for BIG OIL. They’re not going to report a spill, unless they have to.

At a time when voters expect innovative solutions. This administration sticks to the same ‘ol same ‘ol. Contracts to cronys and big business.

GRAPHIC: 60 BILLION. BACKGROUND, CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS, HYDROCARBONS.

NARRATOR: When the farms lands don’t drain, and the San Joaquin Valley salts up, it can no longer be farmed. How much of its water will be used for speculative development?
Reports indicate that farmers are already irrigating with oil and fracking waste water. Why are we paying to pollute?

GRAPHIC: 60 BILLION.

TRANSITION – FLIP OR PAGE TURN – SHOTS GOVERNOR BROWN WITH OIL AND GAS EXECS, DOLLAR SIGNS DANCING, FAT CATS LIGHTING CIGARS, WILDLIFE RUNNING FOR COVER.

MUSIC UP: PUNK COVER OF CALIFORNIA DREAMING

NARRATOR: And the tunnel scam project that’s behind it has costs of its own: The 2013 Report on Affordability and Financing for the Bay Delta Conservation says $60 million or more. And THAT no longer includes a habitat conservation plan – meaning not just humans will pay the price. Series of cuts of pictures of native fauna. Cute animals.

MUSIC: PUNK COVER OF “CALIFORNIA DREAMING” EVOLVES INTO DISHARMONY, DISCORD, THEN POPS, CRACKLES, DROPOUTS AND FINALLY NOTHING.

CUT TO: STAND UP INTERVIEW YOUNG WOMAN
“They’re getting water very, very cheaply and they’re taking water away from farms.”

CUT TO: STAND UP INTERVIEW OLDER MAN
“In a time of water catastrophe, California is prioritizing unsustainable solutions over sustainable ones, like diversified farming in the Delta.”

NARRATOR: Who’s paying for this?

CUT TO: Ordinary homes on a residential street with a moon overhead.

SFX UP: CRICKETS.

OLDER WOMAN’S VOICE IS HEARD: This… is a nightmare.

SLOW FADE TO BLACK.

###